NGOs: the best PR and Spin Doctors that (sex-industry) money can buy

Update: The German version has been made available by German Sisters, and is available here:

http://abolition2014.blogspot.de/2015/08/ngos-beste-pr-und-meinungsmacher-die.html

Don’t hesitate to read and share!

Disclaimer: Anyone seriously concerned about the topic of prostitution is advocating for the decriminalization of the Prostituted (women and children). The position adopted in this text is to criminalize the buying and the procuring of women and children as goods in the “sex-industry” for the enjoyment of men.

I refuse to use the terminology “sex-work”, if not in quotations. Words are important, and the term “sex-work” conceals the fact that 95% of the Prostituted are Women and Children. The term also implies that prostitution is a reasonable career choice for a human being and a normal way  to make a living, like domestic work or any other physical labor job. 

“The Prostituted” is a term that actually reflects the  reality of the situation and the ramifications of the Industry. Many survivors find it the most apt word.  It is used by the artist Suzzan Blac who herself survived the slave-trade of prostitution and pornography.

2012_mind

“Mind fuckers” 2012

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Suzzan Blac Art: Resilience and Truth

I love your comments and I follow all the links I get. We might argue, but most often we share anger, indignation, ideas and solidarity (yes, I’m lucky that you take the time to leave a word of appreciation!)

This time, I -was lucky enough that Suzzan Blac read my text, commented, and left me an open door to her work.

I followed the link and it was mind-blowing. Her story is sadly way too common. Her resilience is not.

“Suzzan Blac’s early years were the stuff of the darkest nightmares: abject poverty and spirit-crushing abuse. Adolescence brought a harrowing coercion into the horrific world of the sex trade where she was held prisoner. She escaped, but spiraled into depression. Eventual marriage to a loving man and two beautiful children gave her a sense of normalcy for the first time in her life. But the long buried memories kept her an emotional hostage. To free herself and heal, she started painting. Out came 42 pieces, so raw they shocked even the artist. She hid them for a decade. When finally she revealed them, fame followed. Her work is exhibited around the world.”

Her art breaches intellectual defenses and hypocrisy. Her art overwhelms the heart. You can’t search “logical” counter arguments while looking at it. This is visceral, you absorb her message, and suddenly the story of her life is yours too. The trigger warning comes here, as many will recognize themselves in the things she paints, those things people don’t like to talk about. It’s distressing.

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